Apricot Facts; How Mutch Important, Benificial And Interesting?

An apricot is a fruit or the tree that bears the fruit of several species in the genus Prunus (stone fruits). Usually, an apricot tree is from the species P. armeniaca, but the species P. brigantina, P. mandshurica, P. mume, and P. sibirica are closely related, have similar fruit, and are also called apricots.

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When They're in Season

Fresh apricots are available year-round throughout North America. From May through August, varieties mainly come from California and Washington. The rest of the year they're likely from South America.

How to Choose Apricots

To select ripe apricots, look for fruit with a rich, orange color -- not pale yellow or green -- that's a little soft to the touch.

Calories and Nutrients

One apricot has only 17 calories.

Apricots are an excellent source of vitamin A and a good source of vitamin C, dietary fiber, and potassium.

Family and Name

The fruit is a member of the rosaceae or rose family and is closely related to the similar-looking peach and plum.

In Latin, the apricot is called praecocquum, which means "early-ripening peach."

Where They Came From

Apricots originated in Asia more than 4,000 years ago, migrating to Persia and the Mediterranean before Spanish explorers brought them to the United States.

In China, apricots were once called "moons of the faithful" and were thought to enhance women's fertility